Thursday, September 03, 2009

Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

Someone left a child's book about Mary in the vestibule of my church. I read it and the first couple of chapters were charming but because the author was a member of the Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Fr. Feeney's group, I was cautious. And sure enough there was a problem. The author seemed to have a tremendous issue with Jews. When the book got to St. Joseph it states that God chose him for Mary because the saint was not a typical Jew in that he did not take part in the pursuit of money or power. Can you say stereotype, boys and girls? St. Joseph was not tycoon, obviously but he didn't work for free. He didn't go skipping around Nazareth with daisies and daydreams. Mary and Jesus lived off of what he made so I'm certain that he was quite serious about getting paid for his work.

The book then went on to state that St. Joseph went to the synagogue but had no official position there since he was not a show off. He even had (according to the book a gentile type job because Jews weren't good builders! I wonder who the author thought built all the houses and buildings in Israel. I almost never throw a book into the trash. I'll donate them, give them to friends or sell them but this thing had so little redeeming value I just couldn't pass it on to anyone else.

5 comments:

matthew archbold said...

I can't even believe something like that would get printed. Ick.

Lola said...

I almost never throw a book away, even when I disagree with the content.

But, the one you threw away was a sorry waste of paper and ink.

R J said...

Fr. Francois Laisney's 2001 book IS FEENEYISM CATHOLIC? does a thorough demolition job on Feeneyism, and in particular on how it simply chops-and-changes traditional Catholic teaching for its own sorry ends.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

"did not take part in the pursuit of money or power. Can you say stereotype, boys and girls? St. Joseph was not tycoon, obviously but he didn't work for free."

He perhaps did on occasion? For a poor man, or as thanks for hospitality during flight to Egypt?

That said, "pursuit of money" is sth other than charging a due price for your product (such as a new chair) or service (such as repairing an old one).

So, the meaning of it is, he was not a tycoon and not even a tycoon wannabee or tycoon admirer.

Now, is this quite true of the other Jews of the time?

It seems some are measuring blessing of God in terms of how much riches they have, as if the material blessings to Abraham were not also part of God's taking his side in the "competition" with the big powers back then or a preparation for the making of a nation. When Israel went INTO Egypt, they were ... Genesis 46:[26] All the souls that went with Jacob into Egypt, and that came out of his thigh, besides his sons' wives, sixty-six. [27] And the sons of Joseph, that were born to him in the land of Egypt, two souls. All the souls of the house of Jacob, that entered into Egypt, were seventy.

With fewer, they might not have become a people in Gessen/Goshen. And Abraham's material blessings were there to make this people possible.

But some, both Jews and certain Protestants, read Genesis as a promise of God materially blessing each and every good Christian (or, since Jews are now mostly Anti-Christian, "every good Jew") and as if poor people were automatically deserving to be poor, not just by little effort to gain riches, but by sins.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

"The book then went on to state that St. Joseph went to the synagogue but had no official position there since he was not a show off."

Sounds likely.

"He even had (according to the book a gentile type job because Jews weren't good builders!"

Perhaps this is a misunderstanding for the category "gentile or sinner" and Jew here means "pious Jew"?

Pious Jews were not often builders, not often shepherds (except perhaps those of the temple, guarding sacrificial sheep), not often fishermen.