Saturday, February 13, 2010

Return from Calvary by Herbert Schmaltz




A couple years ago, Rocky and I were on vacation in Pennsylvania and we stayed at a bed and breakfast that had this huge oil painting on the living room wall. I fell in love with it and took note of the name and painter. One of these days I'm buying a copy.
It shows an exhausted Mary, Sts. John, and Mary Magdalene and the other holy women at dusk after the crucifixion. They have buried Christ and must stop all labor because of the sabbath but nothing can stop their grief. The painter hints at their hopes with the use of light and darkness. Darkness is covering the land but it lifts where Mary stands and just over the three crosses in the background.

8 comments:

Kindred Spirit said...

This is breathtakingly beautiful, an excellent picture for meditation during Lent. Thank you for posting this.

Charlotte said...

Hey there,
I have a statue of St. Dymphna I want to get rid of (given to me, not enough room, don't have a devotion to it.) I think it's from the 1960's. Would you like it before I put it on Ebay or something else? It's yours free.

Mary Ellen said...

I've never seen that painting and I'm awe struck. I would love to get a copy myself. Thank you for putting up on your blog because I'm not sure if I would ever have come across it.

Dymphna said...

Charlotte I'd love to have a St. Dymphna. How do I contact you with my address?

Charlotte said...

Leave a comment on my Bumpie's Baby Book blog (comments are moderated) with either an email address for us to communicate or simply your mailing address, whatever you're more comfortable with.

Lola said...

Thank you for sharing.

It's beautiful.


Now, I have yet another painting to add to my wish list starting with Tanner's Annunciation, then Our Lady of the Olives...

Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

Excellent posting, Dymph.

MimiShoup said...

I was experiencing the heart break as a mother & came across this same picture in a antique shop. They wanted over $300.00 for it! At the time I was going through my mourning process I felt like no one truly understood my pain...until I saw this picture which put everything into a very different perspective. I felt understood for the first time & realized that Mary knew that sorrow way beyond what I had experienced! When I went to see my grandparents I told them how moved I was by this magnificent piece of art work & my Grandfather who had Alzheimer's said "seems to me we have that painting... If you can get to it it's yours." Years later after Grandpa's entering into a nursing home (because my father & I could no longer care for him at home) we were dismantling the homestead & there in the clutter of the attic was this very lithograph! What a precious gift it was!! I cherish it to this day!