Thursday, December 31, 2009

I don't get it

A priest in England got a bit bothered by this mosaic in Westminster Cathedral. With all due respect to a highly learned and sophisticated man of God, I don't get it. I'm an Philistine, I guess.

10 comments:

Cliff said...

Actually, go back and read the additional comments after what you posted.

To the iconographically uninitiated, your blog comment makes sense, but after gaining some knowledge of WHAT an icon is supposed to be, then the priests blog reigns superior.

Dymphna said...

You're probably right. The rules of iconography are very strict and completely above my head. I did think it was pretty though.

Terry Nelson said...

The rules of Orthodox/Byzantine iconography apply to the Orthodox - this image was done in a Byzantine style for a Latin rite church. Father was criticizing it as if it was an Orthodox piece.

The work is very much geared to Western taste and spirituality.

Cliff said...

Ouch! I just reread my first comment and realize it was kinda gruff. Sorry.

I really don't know about icons either, and yes, I thought it was pretty too. Guess that shows what I know... :)

Dymphna said...

It's alright, Cliff.

Smiley said...

I dont know a lot about iconography. But Jesus is making a V for victory sign with his fingers. That is sooooo wrong and out of place.

Cliff said...

Hey Smiley, I've always thought those two fingers were for "pax Christi", or peace of Christ. Even "VICTORY" over sin & death seems appropriate.

Smiley said...

No really it isnt appropriate. It is not an old custom but rather new. I dont htink jesus ever made a thumbs up or a victor V.
To a Catholic a victory sign is the Cross. That is the victory over Sin and Death

Cliff said...

Hey Smiley, OK I've done some researching and still think the two-fingered "V-sign" is appropriate & traditional (small "t" traditional!). Look it up on wikipedia, and follow the external links for more info.

The palm facing outward is meant as either peace, victory or the cross. The palm inward is bad, particularly in England & Australia.

It really is a common symbol as can be seen here, here, here, here, & here .

This has been an interesting discussion & God bless you all.

Dymphna said...

I thought the two figures were a sign of His two natures?