Tuesday, January 26, 2010

If you want to get married in the Phoenix diocese you'll have to take 9 months of prep classes

I predict that a lot of couples in the Phoenix diocese are going to say to heck with it and get married in a civil ceremony or go to other denominations.

9 comments:

Old Bob said...

Well, that will show how committed the couples are -- or aren't -- to the Church and her teachings on marriage. What really worries me, though, is that some of those couples may well get a civil ceremony and stay with the Church and act as though their marriage is valid.

Anita Moore said...

I'm with Bob. Nine months is really quite a short span of time when you compare it, say, to the time it takes to become a fully professed religious.

Besides: the trials and setbacks that saints have endured in following their vocations frankly make nine months of marriage prep seem petty by comparison. St. John Vianney was a lousy student in seminary from an academic standpoint. Ven. Pius XII's priestly calling was seriously endangered by his poor health -- it took the personal (and unprecedented) intervention of Pope Leo XIII to see him through to ordination. And the Little Flower suffered delay after delay and setback after setback, first to entering Carmel, and then to making her profession.

We're really short on patience in this world -- and that's too bad, because marriage is one thing where, if you make a mistake, it's not like somebody just gets an extra bag of fries.

Bonum, Verum, Pulchrum said...

If folks want to leave the church because they cannot except her disciplines and teachings then they are free to do so. The faith was spread by twelve commited men and we have the promise of our Lord that the gates of hell shall not prevail against Holy Mother Church!

Lola said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lola said...

Dymphna, you are spot on.

I total agree.

Although some of those blessed enough to go with the Diocese Program, just might get a better start than many marriages before them.

Kim B said...

I think it makes clear to those seeking marriage in the church that while the institution of marriage is taken lightly in our secular culture today, the sacrament of marriage within the Church is a serious matter. Just as an adult sits through 9 months + of RCIA to come into the full communion of the Church, those seeking to receive the sacrament of marriage should be expected to take their time and learn about the responsibilities this commitment carries with it - both to their spouses and to the Church.

Patriot2010 said...

Oh be quite Bob, "act as though their marriage is valid?" What makes you think the church has any power otherwise? Just because they have convinced you they have, doesn't make it so!
Granted, people desiring to be married should get some solid information concerning what to expect, how to communicate, and when and not too, communicate. Those that are married, should also take the class. Why? Because churches, schools and society have failed us in teaching us about the past so we don't repeat it.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

"If folks want to leave the church because they cannot except her disciplines and teachings then they are free to do so."

Nine months prep class is NOT a discipline or teaching of the Church.

In fact, in the 1983 "canon law", perhaps in older and truer versions as well, you get two months to find a priest to marry you, if you can't find one, you are free to marry without one.

And even after 1983, I suppose Roman Canon law is supposed to trump the local discipline of the diocese of Phoenix.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

"Besides: the trials and setbacks that saints have endured in following their vocations frankly make nine months of marriage prep seem petty by comparison. St. John Vianney was a lousy student in seminary from an academic standpoint. Ven. Pius XII's priestly calling was seriously endangered by his poor health -- it took the personal (and unprecedented) intervention of Pope Leo XIII to see him through to ordination. And the Little Flower suffered delay after delay and setback after setback, first to entering Carmel, and then to making her profession."

Come ON, you know marriage is not the vocation of the most heroic souls!

It is unfair to demand the kind of tests that are there for people becoming nuns or priests to those who are no more than getting married!