Thursday, March 04, 2010

Something to ponder


St. Faustina once had a vision in which the Lord told her she was due one day in Purgatory. She was horrified and ashamed and offered to go immediately. The Lord asked her if she'd rather live a longer life and spread His message of mercy and accept whatever earthly suffering came for the sake of souls. She accepted.


It dawned on me after reading this section of her diary that if a pious little Polish farm girl who was worthy of visions still was going to Purgatory for one day then I, and the rest of us of are in a whole lot of trouble.

8 comments:

Kim B said...

I don't think purgatory is a place to fear. It's a place to "wash up" before we meet our creator. There's joy in knowing you will meet Him, there's suffering in longing to be with Him. But being in purgatory is your final cleansing and I'm okay with that. God forgives us our mishaps, but we still have to do "the time" so to speak - just as I forgive my son when he throws things in the living room after I've warned him to stop, but I still put him in a time out. You go to the Sacrament of Penance, you have genuine remorse for your misteps, you receive forgiveness and you have no reason to believe you will not see the face of God someday. I'm happy to pay for all the things I've done to offend God if it means I'll be all the better to meet him as he is worthy.

Bonum, Verum, Pulchrum said...

Great story for the Lenten season Dymphna! It reminded me of Our Lady at Fatima. She hesitated when she was asked if Francisco ( the seer) was going to heaven? She finally said that yes, he would go to heaven, but that he would have to pray many rosaries. If that young boy, who died at the age of eight, almost didn't make it and caused the Mother of God to pause, how much harder must the rest of us work at attaining salvation. I am again reminded of the admonition of St. James, "work out your salvation in fear and trembling". Protestants have conveniently ommitted this book from their bibles!

Dave said...

The Letter of James is in the Protestant New Testament as well, but they have a tendency to explain it away...

Anita Moore said...

Kim,

It's true, if we make it to Purgatory, then we've made it. But the saints tell us that the suffering in Purgatory far exceeds the worst suffering on earth. Aquinas (if memory serves) said that the fires of Purgatory are the same as the fires of hell, except that there is hope of escaping the fires of Purgatory.

You know what they say: if you aim for Heaven and miss, you land in Purgatory. But if you aim at Purgatory and miss...

Dave said...

Anita:

What Purgatory is like is a matter of speculation. Personally, I think Dante's model makes the most sense.

Anita Moore said...

Dave, Dante's image of Purgatory is one of the most sobering. Remember the long line of souls waiting to get INTO Purgatory? Since they made God wait during their lives for them to finally repent and make their peace with Him, so now He is making them wait to get into Purgatory! (What was it, something like seven years of waiting for every one year they made God wait.)

JMB said...

According to Fr. Benedict Groeshel in the book "Arise from Darkness", most of us will end up in purgatory and it should not be something to fear, as it means a "purification" process.

I just found your blog from Charlotte's. I love it!

Dave said...

Anita, I didn't say Dante made Purgatory fun...but his conception of it makes sense. Which is why I'm hoping those who love me will have me remembered at the altar as much as possible when I've gone there (I hope).